Melt-in-your-mouth braised / slow-cooked meat dishes?

1,220
255
Joined Sep 21, 2001
Recently made pulled pork out of a Boston butt. I seared the fat cap then turned it over, covered the braising pot, and in a 180F oven for overnight. It just fell apart the next morning.
 
5,494
430
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Recently made pulled pork out of a Boston butt. I seared the fat cap then turned it over, covered the braising pot, and in a 180F oven for overnight. It just fell apart the next morning.
Very cool. Wow 180F is so freaking low. I have a friend who does a lot of slow cooking who tells me that's the temp he uses too. I'll have to try that then.

What spices or other ingredients did you add to the pot for your pulled pork? And how did you serve it? Sandwiches, or with sides? Sounds like a good comfy winter dinner.

Lately I've been making a version of carnitas, little chunks of boston butt marinated with onions, garlic, lemons, dried orange zest powder, oregano, bay leaves, toasted cumin, allspice and coriander seeds, dark moscovado sugar, dash of worcestershire and a few tablespoons duck fat (I have tones of the stuff and no lard). Slow cooked around 200—230F for 8 or 9 hours in a flat gratin dish almost fully covered with parchment paper. It still gets crispy on top even under the parchment paper. I wonder if it would continue doing that at 180F or if I would have to shred it first then crisp it up under the broiler?
 
1,220
255
Joined Sep 21, 2001
IMG_20170917_230547.jpg

Before and after. IMG_20170918_105947.jpg

What I did was coat the pork butt with a good covering of Adobo on both sides, sear the fat cap, turn over the butt, cover lightly with parchment and into a preheated oven. I start the oven hot (400F) put in the pork then turn down the heat. I like to let it braise overnight. After it has cooled, I pull it apart with a fork.
To make carnitas I will use the braising pan and put in the shredded pork and fry it in the fat and juices leftover from braising, season heavily with chili and spices and fry till crispy.
 
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2,832
231
Joined Nov 15, 2012
I love them and use them often. In fact, I made some juniper butter yesterday to spread under the skin of the roast cockerel we had for Christmas dinner. Sorry - off topic.
Just saw a duck leg confit heavy on juniper and bay leaf, with some thyme. I'll try foul next. And fish, why not? I bet oily blue fish would be an especially good candidate.
 

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